Grow Peas This Winter & Make Money

The pea is most commonly the small spherical seed or the seed-pod of the pod fruit Pisum sativum. Each pod contains several peas, which can be green or yellow. Botanically, pea pods are fruit, since they contain seeds and develop from the ovary of a (pea) flower. The name is also used to describe other edible seeds from the Fabaceae such as the pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), the cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), and the seeds from several species of Lathyrus.

Grow Peas This Winter & Make Money
Grow Peas This Winter & Make Money

The pea is most commonly the small spherical seed or the seed-pod of the pod fruit Pisum sativum. Each pod contains several peas, which can be green or yellow. Botanically, pea pods are fruit, since they contain seeds and develop from the ovary of a (pea) flower. The name is also used to describe other edible seeds from the Fabaceae such as the pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), the cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), and the seeds from several species of Lathyrus.

P. sativum is an annual plant, with a life cycle of one year. It is a cool-season crop grown in many parts of the world; planting can take place from winter to early summer depending on location. The average pea weighs between 0.1 and 0.36 gram.The immature peas (and in snow peas the tender pod as well) are used as a vegetable, fresh, frozen or canned; varieties of the species typically called field peas are grown to produce dry peas like the split pea shelled from a matured pod. These are the basis of pease porridge and pea soup, staples of medieval cuisine; in Europe, consuming fresh immature green peas was an innovation of Early Modern cuisine.

Peas are grown in varied weather conditions.

They require cold and dry weather. The longer the cold spell, the better the yield. Germination can even take place at a maximum temperature of 50 degrees but the process is slow.

Peas require well drained sandy loam soils. They should be rich in organic matter as this enhances better growth by supplying nutrients at a slower rate.
 
Peas do not thrive in highly acidic or alkaline soil or saline soil, for they do well in soils with a pH of 6.5.

Peas seed should be treated with rhizobium culture. The bacterium used for inoculation is rhizobium lequmino. This will not only help to fix atmospheric nitrogen but also to reduce manure application.

You mix one sachet of rhizobium with two cups of sugar and 70kg of peas and two litres of water. When planting peas the spacing is 1,5 metres, centre to centre, with two rows at the top of the bed, 30 cm apart.

Planting stations should be between 5 and 6cm in-row. It is advisable to do a soil test first but the general fertilizer recommendation is basal compound at the rate of between 400 and 600kg per hectare.

Ammonium nitrate is applied at the rate of 200kg per hectare, split into three applications, between one and four weeks after emergence. Sulphate of potash is applied at the rate of 200kg per hectare split into two application between six and eight weeks after emergence.

Pests


  1. Pea weevil which can be controlled by spraying Diazon

  2. Pea borer can be controlled by spraying DDVP

  3. Pea leaf miner can be controlled using Ampligo

Diseases


Use Tebuconazole and Bravo to control pea rust


Use Dithane and Copper Oxchloride to control powdery mildew

Sources: www.wikipedia.com and www.sundaymail.co.zw